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FULL HOUSE BREW CREW Featuring ROTTING CHRIST Member Release ‘Hollow God’ Lyric Video

FULL HOUSE BREW CREW is: Vagelis Karzis – Vocals, Guitars (Rotting Christ)
Spiros Dafalias – Bass – George Tzatzakis – Guitars – Alex Keito – Drums

FULL HOUSE BREW CREW Featuring ROTTING CHRIST Member Release ‘Hollow God’ Lyric Video

Greek Power Groove Metallers FULL HOUSE BREW CREW featuring a ROTTING CHRIST member in their ranks, have released a new lyric video for ‘Hollow God’, the track is taken from their monstrous second album ‘Me Against You‘, out on November 16, 2018 via ROAR! Rock Of Angels Records. The video can be viewed here….


Tracklist:
1. Cannot Be Judged
2. Me Against You
3. No One’s Safe
4. Hollow God
5. Bury Me
6. When I Crossed That Door!
7. Hard To Tell
8. Not Again
9. Bring The Chaos
10. Another Life
11. The Undisputed

The album can be pre-ordered here:
http://bit.ly/fhbc-may-mm
http://bit.ly/fhbc-may-roar

After many years of absence, because of Vagelis’ duties as the bass player of the legendary Rotting Christ, FULL HOUSE BREW CREW are coming back with a strong statement of an album.

“No Retreat” and “Black Empty Box” were the fan’s favourite songs from their debut album “Bet It All” and with those songs in mind, now they put out “Me Against You”, which maybe includes the heaviest power grooves ever written from a European artist.

“Me Against You” influences came from bands like Slipknot, Five Finger Death Punch, Pantera, Metallica (Black Album era) and Black Label Society. This made the album more diverse on vocal perspective and more mature compositions!

FULL HOUSE BREW CREW keep on making headbang-worthy records, with melodies that stick to your brain!

FULL HOUSE BREW CREW was founded during 2009 by Vagelis “Van” Karzis, member of Rotting Christ for the last 6 years. Vagelis is the lead singer, lead guitar player and the main songwriter of the band. In 2009 he wrote 10 Heavy Groove songs influenced from bands like Pantera, Black Label Society, Five Finger Death Punch, Godsmack, Metallica and on 2011 having Spiros (bass) and Sakis (drums) on his side they recorded and self-released their first full-length album called Bet It All! Being active all these years by touring and opening for some big bands and festivals in Greece! Spiritual Beggars, Corrosion Of Conformity, 1000Mods and Planet Of Zeus just to name a few!
Having their own style for the Groove rhythms, they combine with aggressiveness and catchy melodies! And just like a thunderbolt charging straight from the top of Mount Olympus, these heavy-riffing monsters are ready to become the next name of “World’s Rock Gods” as been written at Spirit Of Metal!

FULL HOUSE BREW CREW states: “Our first focus is to create GOOD music, then promote it to people, create loyal fan base and tour as much as possible”

www.facebook.com/fullhousebrewcrew
www.fullhousebrewcrew.com

Moonstrux returns with their new single Chapter 3 Apocalypse

Vocal/guitar: MC Maggot, Bass: Still Man, Drums: Jackson

Moonstrux returns with their new single

Chapter 3 Apocalypse

 

PRESS RELEASE :Return of Moonstrux
September 21st 2017 For Immediate release

Moonstrux returns with their new single Chapter 3 Apocalypse, which is sequal to their mega single New Disease. The story of Apocalypse goes: “They wanted us to expand the cult with any means nesessary. But something went wrong. Old Butcher and the others… they are all dead and something got out”

 

Watch the video:

[youtube id=”LTa-xrdXUZ4&feature=youtu.be”]

Biografie
During the Great War world was split in two. To the reality we know and “the other side”. No one really understood why and how it happened. Most people thought it was an act of God to end the war and some people thought it was an unexpected consequense caused by a new type of weapon. In the end, no one really gave shit.

It was time to build a new world without our deformed brothers and sisters. The only link between the worlds were the possessed; people with telepathic connection to the infected ones on “the other side”. In order to cut the unwanted connection, possessed were locked away and forgotten.

Over time “the other side” was forgotten and it became a myth. A Spooky bedtime story for the kids.

“The other side” never forgot their brothers and sisters. They were not able to physically enter this world, but they had eyes and ears everywhere. People were brainwashed as slaves to cause mayhem, bands were converted to spread their word and form cults to make community stronger.

Once we were normal people, but now, we are something else. We bring you stories in form of music from “the other side”. Follow the chapters, become a follower and join the cult.

 

NUCLEAR OATH ‘Razor Blade Regrets’

nuclear_oath_press_photo_web

NUCLEAR OATH ‘Razor Blade Regrets’

For Fans of Lamb Of God, Pantera, Slipknot, Mudvayne, HellYeah

NUCLEAR OATH is a five-member groovy, heavy, sludgy, intense, and interactive metal wrecking crew from Medicine Hat, Alberta. Influenced by such bands as Pantera, Slipknot, Sylosis, Lamb of God, and Avenged Sevenfold, they will be releasing their new album ‘Toxic Playground’ this summer 2017 to follow their debut EP ‘Ashes of the Unborn’. The forthcoming album will take the listeners on a journey inspired by the band’s personal experience and struggles combined with intense energy. They hope each individual who listens takes something different from the band.

“We feel it is an aggressive album from start-to-finish, which generates different emotions as the album progresses.” says the band.

Teaming up with NoCleanSinging.com, NUCLEAR OATH premiere the first cut off the release ‘Razor Blade Regrets’.

The band comments:

“Razor Blade Regrets has a catchy groove that we know you will bang your head to throughout. With a catchy beat and a message based of internal struggle and turmoil, we know each listener will take something unique from the track”

Plus it can be downloaded at their Bandcamp along with the band’s other releases: https://nuclearoath.bandcamp.com/

Check out ‘Razor Blade Regrets’ here…

soundcloud-logo

Greek prog metal/rock band NEED released a live rehearsal video video for ‘Tilikum‘,

need2

NEED is: Jon V. – Vocals  Ravaya – Guitars  Anthony – Keyboards  Victor – Bass  Stelios – Drums

Greek prog metal/rock band NEED released a live rehearsal video video for ‘Tilikum‘, the song is taken from their forthcoming fourth album “Hegaiamas: a song for freedom”, due out on January 17, 2017. The video was shot and recorded live at Studio Π. by John Kaimakamis. The video can be viewed here

NEED recently released an animated music video for ‘Rememory‘ The video was created by Haris Kountouris – HK Visual Creations.

If you are looking for a progressive metal group that 100% justifies these two terms equally or for sophisticated metal music that will make you bang your head with pride, your search is over. Need is the band you were looking for. (Progarchives.com)

Tracklisting:need1

1. Rememory (6.59)
2. Alltribe (7.34)
3. Therianthrope (6.29)
4. Riverthane (7.24)
5. Tilikum (7.48)
6. I.O.T.A. (5.05)
7. Hegaiamas (21.52)

The album was produced by NEED and mixed/mastered by Hector.D at HD Studios. The cover artwork was made by Nick “Eyejacker” Panagiotopoulos.

NEED is a prog metal/rock band based in AthensGreece. Formed in 2004 they have 3 more albums and have toured Europe twice, having shared the stage with the likes of Jon Oliva’s PainSymphony XCandlemass and more while they’ve also performed the 15th edition of ProgPower USA in 2014, at Sonisphere Festival 2011 opening for Iron MaidenMastodonSlipknot and more. NEED to support Evergrey on their forthcoming North American tour in May 2017.

www.facebook.com/needband
www.needband.bandcamp.com
www.needband.net

Fucking Heavy Metal T-shirts Trends….

metal-trolls-hm

Fucking T-shirts Trends….

Onder het moto “Wat weet jij van de band die op je T-shirt staat?”

De mode houdt van metal en metalmuzikanten flirten met ontwerpers. Metalfans hopen dat de hype snel overwaait.

Er was een tijd dat je voor een shirt van je favoriete band moest wachten tot ze in de buurt kwamen spelen. Dan kon je ’m na het concert rechtstreeks van de bassist of de vriendin van de zanger kopen. Monochrome shirts met stekelige, onleesbare logo’s die voorheen een garantie waren voor een hoekje in de trein, waar medereizigers liever uit de buurt bleven. Nu hangen metalshirts gewoon bij H&M. Is dat metal? Eerder een dun laagje chroom.

De esthetiek van heavy metal is de laatste jaren uit het vieze hoekje gekomen en een internationale modetrend geworden. Van Kanye West tot Miley Cyrus en van David Beckham tot de zangeres met de veelzeggende naam Ke$ha – allemaal lopen ze met shirts van Iron Maiden, Metallica, Slayer en Megadeth. En voor 19,99 euro heb je bij H&M ‘een shirt van katoenen tricot met een print’ van Metallica. Dat shirt heeft voor de zekerheid twee gaten. Alsof het in de loop der jaren is versleten nadat je het bij een echt concert hebt gekocht. Er staat een schedel op en ‘Damage Inc.’. Dat is een nummer van Metallica uit 1986 over een meedogenloos bedrijf dat de bevolking tot slaaf heeft gemaakt. Een ander shirt van H&M verwijst naar ‘…And Justice for All’, over hoe sommige mensen over lijken gaan om geld te verdienen.maiden

Metalmerchandise

De ironie ligt er zo dik bovenop dat je er tegenaan kunt leunen. Heavy metal is een wereld waarin hondstrouwe fans en muzikanten elkaar vanuit de schaduwen steunen, zonder al te veel perverse, commerciële prikkels. De wereld van H&M, van snel vervliegende trends en inwisselbare rages, kan daar niet verder van verwijderd zijn.

We weten niet of de dragers van die nieuwe metalmerchandise meer dan twee nummers van de band op hun shirt kennen, maar tekenend is het filmpje dat de zanger van de Belgische gimmickband Fleddy Melculy – bekend van het nummer ‘T-shirt van Metallica’ – onlangs maakte voor Studio Brussel: op festival Pukkelpop vroeg hij mensen met bandshirts of ze wisten waar ze mee liepen. Het meisje met de Slipknot-trui kent geen enkele albumtitel van die band. Het meisje met het shirt van de Rolling Stones kent hit Satisfaction niet. Zelfs de jongen met het shirt van The Beatles kan geen twee nummers van die band noemen. Zijn suggestie ‘With or Without You’ (van U2) telt niet. Alleen de langharige metalhead met het Soulfly-shirt kan die muziek woordelijk meezingen.

Fleddy Melculy – T-shirt van Metallica

 

De Amerikaanse metaljournalist Kim Kelly werd zo kwaad dat ze er twee pislinke stukken over schreef. Eerst in The Guardian en daarna bij muzieksite Noisey. Zij schrijft over bedrijven als H&M en Urban Outfitters: „Je kan van vrijwel elke metalband rechtstreeks een cool T-shirt kopen voor minder dan twintig piek, en tegelijk hun bankrekening spekken. Maar in plaats daarvan vragen die bedrijven honderden dollars voor lelijke, halfbakken ‘edgy’ troep.”

Want het gaat verder dan oude ontwerpen herdrukken. Kanye West heeft een hele merchandiselijn met zijn bijnaam Yeezus, in de typografie van Metallica. Justin Bieber deed dat met de letters van Pentagram. Beyoncé verkoopt buttons met ‘Slayoncé’, in het lettertype van Slayer. Modemerk Balenciaga deed het met Iron Maiden, en het superhippe Vetements uit Frankrijk met het beeldmerk van de legendarische blackmetalband Immortal – waarin Kanye West zich dan weer laat fotograferen.

Metalbands zelf doen zelf mee aan het ‘vermainstreamen’ van het genre. Metallica laat zich kleden door pakkenmerk Brioni. Deafheaven werkt samen met zonnebrillenmerk Ray-Ban, en Marilyn Manson doet modellenwerk bij Marc Jacobs. Er moeten natuurlijk rekeningen worden betaald, maar hun mode-uitstapjes voelen toch als vreemdgaan.

Overigens liggen die metalshirts bij H&M er ook alleen maar omdat die bands er de licenties voor hebben verkocht. Daar is een term voor: sell-outs.

Inspiratie en imitatiethrash-metal-t-shirt-dead-slayer-kendall

Maar dan ben je er nog niet, want niet alleen bandshirts maken steeds meer deel uit van het straatbeeld. De complete metallook – zwarte motorjassen, studs, patches etc. – is op dit moment gemeengoed. Daar is op zich niks mis mee. Maar, zoals Kelly schreef, „er is wel een verschil tussen inspiratie en imitatie”. Noem het culturele appropriatie: het adopteren van elementen uit een (sub)cultuur en die reduceren tot simpel stereotype. Denk aan het dragen van verentooien van Noord-Amerikaanse Indianen. Zonder geschiedenis of context wordt een deel van de identiteit van die groep ineens inwisselbaar. Cultuur als kostuum.

Metalheads vormen natuurlijk geen onderdrukte minderheid, laten we niet overdrijven. Maar beledigen kun je ze wel. Het is pijnlijk dat het uiterlijke bewijs van het hondstrouw volgen van hun favoriete bands ineens een oppervlakkig modedingetje is geworden. Dat hun ‘uniformen’, waarvoor ze voorheen vaak door de buitenwereld zijn beschimpt en bespuugd, nu een accessoire zijn voor hippe chicks en dudes.

Meghan MacRae, een van de oprichters van underground metalcultuur website Cvlt Nation, zei het tegen Noisey laatst zo: „Metal en punk zijn gewoon geen modetrends. Het zijn culturen waarbij een bepaalde manier van leven en wereldbeeld past. Als je die indikt tot een stereotype ‘look’ voor een paar seizoenen, dan is dat beledigend voor mensen die hun leven hebben gewijd aan die culturen.”

Wat kan een metalhead er nog tegenin brengen? Muziek natuurlijk, om te beginnen. Er is natuurlijk helemaal geen dresscode in zo’n vrije cultuur als metal. De muziek is veel belangrijker en aangezien metal nogal een acquired taste is, houden de fans hierop voorlopig nog wel even het alleenrecht.

Verder is het een kwestie van een lange adem. Trends komen en gaan, en heavy metal als moderage gaat wel weer voorbij. Als de pubers van nu uit hun imitatieleren bikerjacks zijn gegroeid, blijven de harde rockers over. Een echte metalhead heeft geen hair extensions nodig, en een echte tatoeage blijft ook na dat avondje rode loper zitten.

En luister anders eens naar Metallica’s ‘Damage Inc.’, dan begrijp je misschien beter wat het betekent om zo’n shirt aan te trekken. „Living on your knees, conformity / Or dying on your feet for honesty / Inbred, our bodies work as one / Bloody, but never

Verslag: Peter van der Ploeg

Foto Hollandse Hoogte

 

 

 

THE DEFINITIVE HISTORY OF EVERY SLIPKNOT MASK.

THE DEFINITIVE HISTORY OF EVERY SLIPKNOT MASK

16 years and five albums later, Slipknot’s masks have evolved time and time again

It was, of course, Slipknot’s lynchpin Clown who came up with the idea of their masks. It was shortly before the band’s first ever gig, on Halloween in 1995, and the band were rehearsing.

“We were all going around the room asking, ‘What are you going to wear?’” remembered Clown. “I pulled up the clown mask I had and said, ‘I’m wearing this’.” It did not go down well with his bandmates.

“A few of them were like, ‘No fucking way. You can’t be the only guy wearing some stupid mask’,” he recalled. “So I said, ‘I really don’t care what you think, this is who I am and this is what I’m going to do.’ So here we are all these years later …”

Iconic, terrifying and, sometimes, quite funny: the Slipknot masks became such a part of their early legend that the photographer Paul Harries, who shot the band countless times in the early days, recalls being stopped by fans outside shows and asked if he’d seen Slipknot without their masks. “Do they have real faces underneath?” he was asked once. And with that, a legend was born.

Slipknot (1999)

Corey Taylor

Corey Taylor
Featuring dreadlocks poking out of the top and an expressionless, ghostly face, singer Corey Taylor felt his first mask allowed the band’s music to be purer. “Music then was basically a template for a bunch of hot guys to sell a bunch of shit that didn’t mean anything. We put a mask on and we’re not about our fucking faces. It’s always gonna be music first.”

Mick Thomson

Mick Thomson
Guitarist Mick Thomson’s first mask was a store-bought hockey mask, which he later changed into a black leather gimp mask. “Roadrunner didn’t like the masks,” said Clown later. “They also didn’t want nine guys in the band but I can’t tell you how many millions of dollars that label has made from us. I take pride in knowing that they were wrong and I was right.”

Jim Root

 Jim Root
Guitarist Jim Root inherited his first mask from his predecessor in the band, Josh Brainard. A black bondage mask, he found it too uncomfortable to play in so adopted a jester’s mask as he thought it reflected his personality better.

Craig Jones

 Craig Jones
The band’s most enigmatic member initially simply wore a pair of knickers over his head, before he got an old crash helmet, hammered long nails through it, and added a flashlight to the top.

Sid Wilson

 Sid Wilson
The band DJ, Sid Wilson’s, mask was ever-changing, frequently altering drastically from album to album. His first was a simple gas mask, a basic but futuristic look.

Shawn Crahan

 Shawn Crahan
Shawn Crahan’s iconic clown mask was the one that started the whole idea. “I was in the mall with a girlfriend and walked into a Halloween store. There was a clown mask there and when I put it on, I became another thing. It was $49 and I had $50 in my pocket. I was supposed to be buying my girlfriend lunch and she got all pissed off because I spent all my money on this mask. Well… she’s gone but I still have him downstairs.”

Chris Fehn

 Chris Fehn
Essentially a gimp mask, with a mouth that could be zipped up and a long, phallic, Pinocchio nose that percussionist Chris Fehn would ‘masturbate’ frequently while onstage. “It reflects my comic personality,” he said. “Plus I chose it for the bondage factor.”

Paul Gray

 Paul Gray
Bassist and songwriter Paul Gray would initially simply wrap tape around his head, before deciding on a Halloween pig mask for the band’s debut – the band had told him it reflected his self-indulgent nature. He was criticised by rival band Mushroomhead, who claimed he had stolen the idea from them.

Joey Jordison

 Joey Jordison
One night, when he was a kid, Joey Jordison’s mother came home from a Halloween party wearing an utterly blank, and thus eerily terrifying, Japanese Kabuki mask. Its emotionless stare stuck with him and he adopted it for Slipknot.

Iowa (2001)

Corey Taylor

 Corey Taylor
Taylor’s Iowa mask was virtually the same as the one for the band’s self-titled debut, except it was blacker to fit the band’s mood at that time. “I was drinking like a fucking fish. It was bad, it was a scary fucking time to be in Slipknot because we did not give a fuck and not in a good way.”

Mick Thomson

 Mick Thomson
Thomson wore the same mask for Iowa as on the band’s debut. Now painted to look metallic, it featured a grill across the mouth – a nod to the old hockey mask – and would be something the guitarist would more or less stick with forever more.

Jim Root

 Jim Root
Root’s mask barely changes throughout the band’s history and by Iowa, it was simply a more detailed version of its predecessor – a jester’s face, with zipper mouth and menacing red eyes. “The guys chose this mask to tame me,” he said. “I was a timid guy before I joined this band. Now I’m a freak.”

Craig Jones

 Craig Jones
By Iowa, Jones’s crash helmet had become a bondage mask but it still had the porcupine-like nails protruding from it. He added a mouth zipper and, during interviews, the notoriously quiet sampler would delight in slowly drawing the zip closed whenever he was asked a question.

Sid Wilson

 Sid Wilson
The DJ’s mask evolved rapidly from the simple gas mask of the band’s debut, to a more skull-shaped gas mask for the band’s follow up. Wilson had nine of them made, giving each its own name.

Shawn Crahan

 Shawn Crahan
Clown’s mask developed quickly from the traditional (if spooky) clown face of the debut to the sinister Iowa incarnation. Still a clown, this one featured an upside down pentagram, two horns and a portion of the scalp torn back to reveal a bloody brain.

Chris Fehn

 Chris Fehn
Fehn’s Iowa mask was virtually the same as the one he wore in the self-titled album, but for one difference: “The smell gets worse, it smells like puke, sweat, and piss!”

Paul Gray

 Paul Gray
Gray was one of the few members of Slipknot to enjoy the Iowa period – “Hell, I had a great time,” he said – and wore an updated, slightly more human latex version of the pig mask he used on the band’s debut but this one had slits across the mouth.

Joey Jordison

 Joey Jordison
Jordison added black corpse paint to his Iowa Kabuki mask, and still enjoyed the inscrutably blank nature of it. “You feel however you want to feel; scary, evil or perverted,” he said. “All those things held in one mask”.

Vol.3: (The Subliminal Verses) (2004)

Corey Taylor

 Corey Taylor
The dreadlocks were gone by Vol.3, replaced by multicoloured hair, but the stitched up, skinless face remained as Taylor battled personal demons behind the mask. “I was pretty much drunk from the beginning of Iowa until three months into recording Volume 3.”

Mick Thomson

 Mick Thomson
The Vol. 3 version of Thomson’s mask was a relatively simple evolution of the first mask that had served him for the first two album cycles. “If you know who you are, you don’t need change. I think I pretty much nailed it with this one for being able to get across how I am,” he said.

Jim Root

 Jim Root
Again, Root’s mask does not change much. His is still a sinister jester’s face but by Vol.3 the diamonds around the eyes are darker and the face paler.

Craig Jones

 Craig Jones
By Vol. 3, Jones’s mask is slightly bigger and the nails protruding from his head are slightly longer, but the general look remains the same: a bondage Pinhead.

Sid Wilson

 Sid Wilson
For Vol.3, Wilson’s mask changed again and became an out and out skull, a traditional skeleton with blackened nose and filthy teeth.

Shawn Crahan

 Shawn Crahan
Like some kind of horrific post-operative patient, Crahan’s Vol. 3 Clown mask was a mass of bloody bandages wrapped around his face, featuring a macabre red nose out front. He ripped the top from it after a while to let his hair hang out, making him look all the more like a serial killer.

Chris Fehn

 Chris Fehn
A similar mask to his first two, Fehn’s Vol.3 mask essentially just changed colour – starting to rust then eventually turning red – but remained broadly the same: the long nose and zipper mouth.

Paul Gray

 Paul Gray
The pig face had gone by Vol. 3 and was replaced by a more human, Hannibal Lecter style mask, with nails acting as a grill across the mouthpiece. Also included a bullet hole because why not?

Joey Jordison

 Joey Jordison
Jordison’s Kabuki mask remained relatively unchanged, but was updated with various different designs and claw slashes for Vol.3. “It’s very difficult to play in the masks sometimes,” he said. “You feel like you’re locked in hell.”

All Hope Is Gone (2008)

Corey Taylor

 Corey Taylor
In some ways Taylor’s scariest mask is the scariest of all in this period. It featured no hair at all, and had an almost entirely featureless face that appeared stitched to his skull. Eerily blank.

Mick Thomson

 Mick Thomson
An angrier, more menacing update on the same theme: Thomson’s mask broadly remains as the same metallic-looking, futuristic visor throughout the band’s history.

Jim Root

 Jim Root
Again, not much has changed: Root’s mask is still the same jester’s face as before. The black diamond still features around the eyes, and the zip is still drawn shut between black lips.

Craig Jones

 Craig Jones
The mask becomes more metallic and the nails are a little longer, but Jones’s look does not really change from Vol. 3.

Sid Wilson

 Sid Wilson
By All Hope Is Gone, Wilson’s mask had undergone another radical change: now his face resembled a Transformer – he is a fan of the TV show – and featured controllable eyebrows to allow him to change his expression.

Shawn Crahan

 Shawn Crahan
Clown’s All Hope Is Gone mask was probably the most technical: a patchwork of black leather, thick red and white stitching and zips that was both sinister and brooding. “I don’t want any of it to look human – there are no human elements to it,” he said. “The mask is actually made of steel, so I can rip it off my head and use it as a weapon. It’s not some plastic bullshit.” He had an alternate one too: a more human face but one with a such disturbing lack of features that it looked like the plastic dollface of your nightmares.

Chris Fehn

 Chris Fehn
Still featuring its long nose and zipper mouth, Fehn’s All Hope Is Gone mask no longer included the hood that covered the back of his head.

Paul Gray

 Paul Gray
Gray had two masks for his last years in the band, both of which were very similar to his Vol.3 Hannibal Lecter mask, but with the slight additions of small cracks in one and a paint smear on the other.

Joey Jordison

 .5 The Gray Chapter (2014)

Corey Taylor

 Corey Taylor
Taylor’s most human mask: an almost realistic two-piece human face but one that appears riddled with disease and disgust across its cheeks. “People like me, Clown, Sid change our masks drastically,” he said. “Because, for me, the mask is a representation of the person on the inside, and nobody stays the same over time.”

Mick Thomson

 Mick Thomson
The mouth is as distinctive as ever – a five-bar grill across the teeth – but for Thomson’s latest mask, the forehead features more detailed frowning and angrier eyes.

Jim Root

 Jim Root
Root’s mask remains similar – though the zipper mouth has gone to allow room for the long beard he grew for The Gray Chapter.

Craig Jones

 Craig Jones
Jones wears practically the same mask as he has done for the last three album cycles: a black, metallic-looking bowl with zipper mouth and huge spikes protruding all round.

Sid Wilson

 Sid Wilson
The Gray Chapter brought another change, and Wilson’s mask was now a black leather hood, with circular metallic eyes and terrifying teeth that could be covered by a mouth protector.

Clown

 Shawn Crahan
A return to a more traditional clown face, though one that looked like it had lost a back alley fight to a wolf, had been living rough ever since and was all set on tapping you up for a can of Tennents Super.

Chris Fehn

 Chris Fehn
By The Gray Chapter, the hood was back and the mask was coloured a metallic gold. Though the long nose and zipper mouth remained, the eyes were droopier and sadder than before.

Alessandro Venturella

 Alessandro Venturella
Gray’s replacement on bass, Alessandro Venturella, and Jordison’s replacement on drums were initially going to both get the same mask so as to include them in the band but not disrespect past members. In the end, though, Venturella was given a slashed-up, patchwork ogre-like mask

Jay Weinberg

 Jay Weinberg
The band’s new drummer was given a heavily textured mask, featuring a pentagram on the forehead and zip across the mouth.

Could there be more Slipknot material in the works?

Last night Slipknot headlined the first night of Rock On The Range 2015, but before taking to the stage we sat down with guitarist Jim Root for a quick chat.

In the video below, Jim reveals that work may slowly be starting to happen on album number six for Slipknot and there could be a project on the horizon with Ben Weinman from The Dillinger Escape Plan. Imagine that!

Check it out below.

[youtube id=”5&v=HlyWPZJqaA8″]

source:Meatlhammer

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